An analysis of the story of cyrano de bergerac by edmond rostand

A new conception of nobility, modelled on the Italian Renaissance courts and their concept of the perfect courtierwas beginning to evolve through French literature. Central to this transformation of literature were the salons and literary academies which flourished during the first decades of the 17th century; the expanded role of noble patronage was also significant. The production of literary works such as poems, plays, works of criticism or moral reflection was increasingly considered a necessary practice by nobles, and the creation or patronage of the arts served as a means of social advancement for both non- and marginalized noblemen.

An analysis of the story of cyrano de bergerac by edmond rostand

Plot summary[ edit ] Hercule Savinien Cyrano de Bergeraca cadet nobleman serving as a soldier in the French Armyis a brash, strong-willed man of many talents.

In addition to being a remarkable duelist, he is a gifted, joyful poet and is also a musician. However, he has an extremely large nose, which causes him to doubt himself. This doubt prevents him from expressing his love for his distant cousin, the beautiful and intellectual Roxane, as he believes that his ugliness would prevent him the "dream of being loved by even an ugly woman.

Members of the audience slowly arrive, representing a cross-section of Parisian society from pickpockets to nobility.

Cyrano De Bergerac

Meanwhile, Ragueneau and Lebret are expecting Cyrano de Bergerac, who has banished the actor Montfleury from the stage for a month. Christian departs to try to warn him. The play "Clorise" begins with Montfleury's entrance.

Cyrano disrupts the play, forces Montfleury off stage, and compensates the manager for the loss of admission fees. The crowd is going to disperse when Cyrano lashes out at a pesky busybody, then is confronted by Valvert and duels with him while composing a balladewounding and possibly killing him as he ends the refrain as promised: Roxane's duenna then arrives, and asks where Roxane may meet Cyrano privately.

Cyrano, now emboldened, vows to take on the entire mob single-handed, and he leads a procession of officers, actors and musicians to the Porte de Nesle. Cyrano arrives, anxious about his meeting with Roxane.

He is followed by a musketeer, a paramour of Ragueneau's domineering wife Lise, then the regular gathering of impoverished poets who take advantage of Ragueneau's hospitality. Cyrano composes a letter to Roxane expressing his deep and unconditional love for her, warns Lise about her indiscretion with the musketeer, and when Roxane arrives he signals Ragueneau to leave them alone.

Roxane and Cyrano talk privately as she bandages his hand injured from the fracas at the Port de Nesle ; she thanks him for defeating Valvert at the theater, and talks about a man with whom she has fallen in love.

Cyrano thinks that she is talking about him at first, and is ecstatic, but Roxane describes her beloved as "handsome," and tells him that she is in love with Christian de Neuvillette.

Roxane fears for Christian's safety in the predominantly Gascon company of Cadets, so she asks Cyrano to befriend and protect him.

This he agrees to do. After she leaves, Cyrano's captain arrives with the cadets to congratulate him on his victory from the night before. They are followed by a huge crowd, including de Guiche and his entourage, but Cyrano soon drives them away. Le Bret takes him aside and chastises him for his behavior, but Cyrano responds haughtily.

The Cadets press him to tell the story of the fight, teasing the newcomer Christian de Neuvillette. When Cyrano recounts the tale, Christian displays his own form of courage by interjecting several times with references to Cyrano's nose. Cyrano is angry, but remembering his promise to Roxane, he holds in his temper.

Eventually Cyrano explodes, the shop is evacuated, and Cyrano reveals his identity as Roxane's cousin. Christian confesses his love for Roxane but his inability to woo because of his lack of intellect and wit.

When Cyrano tells Christian that Roxane expects a letter from him, Christian is despondent, having no eloquence in such matters. Cyrano then offers his services, including his own unsigned letter to Roxane. The Cadets and others return to find the two men embracing, and are flabbergasted.

The musketeer from before, thinking it was safe to do so, teases Cyrano about his nose and receives a slap in the face while the Cadets rejoice. When Cyrano arrives, Roxane comes down and they talk about Christian: Roxane says that Christian's letters have been breathtaking—he is more intellectual than even Cyrano, she declares.

She also says that she loves Christian. When de Guiche arrives, Cyrano hides inside Roxane's house. De Guiche tells Roxane that he has come to say farewell. He has been made a colonel of an army regiment that is leaving that night to fight in the war with Spain. He mentions that the regiment includes Cyrano's guards, and he grimly predicts that he and Cyrano will have a reckoning.

Afraid for Christian's safety if he should go to the front, Roxane quickly suggests that the best way for de Guiche to seek revenge on Cyrano would be for him to leave Cyrano and his cadets behind while the rest of the regiment goes on to military glory.

After much flirtation from Roxane, de Guiche believes he should stay close by, concealed in a local monastery. When Roxane implies that she would feel more for de Guiche if he went to war, he agrees to march on steadfastly, leaving Cyrano and his cadets behind.

He leaves, and Roxane makes the duenna promise she will not tell Cyrano that Roxane has robbed him of a chance to go to war. Roxane expects Christian to come visit her, and she tells the duenna to make him wait if he does.

Cyrano presses Roxane to disclose that instead of questioning Christian on any particular subject, she plans to make Christian improvise about love.The Play Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand Words | 5 Pages. society and what they do to fit into it.

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The play Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand, is a good example of how this idea is put into play. The main character, Cyrano de Bergerac, is portrayed as . Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand — a Literary and Philosophical Analysis audio.

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the historical Cyrano de Bergerac; the moving story of the play’s opening night in ;.

An analysis of the story of cyrano de bergerac by edmond rostand

A short summary of Edmond Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac. This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of Cyrano de Bergerac. The First Marquis enters and greets his two friends, Baron de Cuigy and Baron de Brissaille.

In this first scene, Rostand conveys the “democratic chaos” of life in France at the time: the elites of society bump into the working classes, spurred on by an artistic event. Cyrano de Bergerac is a play by Edmond Rostand that was first performed in Literary authors, collections of writings, literary criticism, and other related information can be found in both our circulating and reference collections at Middetown Thrall Library.

SparkNotes: Cyrano de Bergerac