Why did the author write a long way gone

At the beginning of the book, he is a young boy whose parents are separated and loves performing rap with his elder brother and friends. After armed forced attack his home village, he, his brother, and friends are left orphans and wander around seeking shelter. Ishmael is eventually claimed as a child soldier for the Sierra Leone Armed Forces at age While there, he is recruited to travel to the United States to speak at a United Nations event about child soldiers.

Why did the author write a long way gone

When he is twelve years old, Beah's village is attacked while he is away performing in a rap group with friends.

The Purpose of A Long Way Gone by Breyana Penn on Prezi

Among the confusion, violence, and uncertainty of the war, Ishmael, his brother, and his friends wander from village to village in search of food and shelter. Their day-to-day existence is a struggle of survival, and the boys find themselves committing acts they would never have believed themselves capable of, such as stealing food from children.

Eventually, Ishmael is conscripted as a soldier by the army and he becomes the very thing he feared: The army becomes his family and he is brainwashed into believing that each rebel death may avenge his own family's slaughter.

why did the author write a long way gone

The boy soldiers become addicted to cocaine, marijuana, and "brown brown," which give them the courage to fight and the ability to repress their emotions in times of war. Ishmael is taken to a rehabilitation center, where he struggles to understand his past and to imagine a future.

The love and compassion he finds at the center from a nurse named Esther opens up an understanding and forgiveness within himself. Ishmael is welcomed by his extended family in Freetown and is again saved by their support and kindness.

why did the author write a long way gone

Ishmael is invited along with other children of war to New York City to tell his story to the United Nations. He learns that others like him have suffered and survived. He meets Laura Simms, a storyteller and his future foster mom, and sees the importance of sharing his experience with the world in hopes of preventing such horrors from happening to other children.

After Ishmael returns to Freetown, Sierra Leone, a coup by the RUF and the military ousts the civilian government, and the war Ishmael has been avoiding catches up with him.

After his uncle's death, Ishmael flees Sierra Leone for neighboring Guinea and eventually makes his way to his new life in the United States.A Long Way Gone.

Ishmael Beah

Ishmael Beah's A Long Way Gone is a sobering firsthand telling of his time as a child soldier during Sierra Leone's decade-long civil war from to This memoir, or. A LONG WAY GONE Ishmael's life wasn't the easiest, but in the end he became a better person, and his life changed completely.

Ishmael fought for about 3 years before he got rescued by UNICEF. After a while Ishmael flew to New York City, and got a foster mother named Laura Simms.

Why did Ishmael beah write his memoir a long way gone A) To share his experience as a child B) To inspire other to move to the us C) To entertain his readers with tales of his childhood5/5(1).

Interview with Ishmael Beah (Author of A Long Way Gone) January,

After Ishmael returns to Freetown, Sierra Leone, a coup by the RUF and the military ousts the civilian government, and the war Ishmael has been avoiding catches up with him. After his uncle's death, Ishmael flees Sierra Leone for neighboring Guinea and eventually makes .

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Ishmael Beah’s A Long Way Gone tells the story of himself, a young teen in the midst of political upheaval, where rebels everywhere are killing many of the innocent civilians of Africa. The book is set in Sierra Leone, where many African rebels were causing chaos at every town they passed by/5.

A Long Way Gone: A Long Way Gone Book Summary & Study Guide | CliffsNotes